"What are you thinking of, Anne?" asked Gilbert, coming down the walk. He had left his horse and buggy out at the road.
“Of Miss Lavendar and Mr. Irving,” answerd Anne dreamily. “Isn’t it beautiful to think how everything has turned out… how they have come together after all the years of separation and misunderstanding?”
“Yes, it’s beautiful,” said Gilbert, looking steadily down into Anne’s uplifted face, “but wouldn’t it have been more beautiful still, Anne, if there had been NO separation or misunderstanding… if they had come hand in hand all the way through life, with no memories behind them but those which belonged to each other?”
For a moment Anne’s heart fluttered queerly and for the first time her eyes faltered under Gilbert’s gaze and a rosy flush stained the paleness of her face. It was as if a veil that had hung before her inner consciousness had been lifted, giving to her view a revelation of unsuspected feelings and realities. Perhaps, after all, romance did not come into one’s life with pomp and blare, like a gay knight riding down: perhaps it crept to one’s side like an old friend through quiet ways: perhaps it revealed itself in seeming prose, until some sudden shaft of illumination flung athwart its pages betrayed the rhythm and the music, perhaps… perhaps… love unfolded naturally out of a beautiful friendship, as a golden-hearted rose slipping from its green sheath.
Then the veil dropped again; but the Anne who walked up the dark lane was not quite the same Anne who had driven gaily down it the evening before.

Anne of Avonlea, L.M. Montgomery. (via the-library-and-step-on-it)

That moment when you realize that you were never Lizzy Bennet, but instead you were Mary, the weird bookish one. #prideandprejudice

kikiyuyu:

courtney-joanna:

I would pay good money to see this. 

finally a sport i’m interested in playing

kikiyuyu:

courtney-joanna:

I would pay good money to see this. 

finally a sport i’m interested in playing

(Source: 4gifs)

GPOY

(Source: queencersei)

I INSTANTLY CRIED.

(Source: thedisneyprincess)

Wanna feel super weird about yourself? Read your old angry facebook conversations from 2006.

Preferences

  • Girl 1: Eww, I don't like it when guys are hairy, but I wouldn't want a guy that has to shave his body hair GROSSSSSS.
  • Girl 2: That's like a guy saying "Eww I don't want a girl who gets her period."
  • Girl 1: ???
  • Girl 2: "No really though. Some girls don't get their period, someone told me that once!"
Is this a thigh gap?
I was going through some pictures and noticed this thing about my body. And I had a brief crisis. Because like, on the one hand, so many suffering people go through so much in an attempt to get the fabled “thigh gap,” and that’s sad and awful. On the other hand, some people (out of a good heart) preach that jutting collarbones and legs that don’t touch are a sure sign of unhealthy body image and starvation.
My legs don’t touch, and I have pronounced clavicles. But guys. I promise that I eat normally. I also don’t exercise much.
Here’s something you may not have thought of. Different people carry their weight on different parts of their bodies. I dress to flatter my mid-section, because that’s where I carry my (perfectly normal) organ-cushioning fat storage. People are always surprised when I tell them my weight because my arms and legs - the parts they see - are disproportionately thin.
Point is, for some people, the thigh gap is like fetch. It’s not going to happen. For others, it’s just the way our bodies are made.
And you know what? That’s okay.
Also.

Is this a thigh gap?

I was going through some pictures and noticed this thing about my body. And I had a brief crisis. Because like, on the one hand, so many suffering people go through so much in an attempt to get the fabled “thigh gap,” and that’s sad and awful. On the other hand, some people (out of a good heart) preach that jutting collarbones and legs that don’t touch are a sure sign of unhealthy body image and starvation.

My legs don’t touch, and I have pronounced clavicles. But guys. I promise that I eat normally. I also don’t exercise much.

Here’s something you may not have thought of. Different people carry their weight on different parts of their bodies. I dress to flatter my mid-section, because that’s where I carry my (perfectly normal) organ-cushioning fat storage. People are always surprised when I tell them my weight because my arms and legs - the parts they see - are disproportionately thin.

Point is, for some people, the thigh gap is like fetch. It’s not going to happen. For others, it’s just the way our bodies are made.

And you know what? That’s okay.

Also.

Happy Labor Day, y’all.

Happy Labor Day, y’all.

So… there’s a thing I really need to brag about.

Read More

Trust me on this one. Wait for two minutes.

Understanding turbans

Sikh men commonly wear a peaked turban that serves partly to cover their long hair, which is never cut out of respect for God’s creation. Devout Sikhs also do not cut their beards, so many Sikh men comb out their facial hair and then twist and tuck it up into their turbans along with the hair from their heads. Sikhism originated in northern India and Pakistan in the 15th century and is one of the youngest of the world’s monotheistic religions. There are an estimated 18 million Sikhs in the world, with some 2 million spread throughout North America, Western Europe and the former British colonies.

Muslim religious elders, like this man from Yemen, often wear a turban wrapped around a cap known in Arabic as a kalansuwa. These caps can be spherical or conical, colorful or solid white, and their styles vary widely from region to region. Likewise, the color of the turban wrapped around the kalansuwa varies. White is thought by some Muslims to be the holiest turban color, based on legends that the prophet Mohammed wore a white turban. Green, held to be the color of paradise, is also favored by some. Not all Muslims wear turbans. In fact, few wear them in the West, and in major cosmopolitan centers around the Muslim world, turbans are seen by some as passé.

Afghan men wear a variety of turbans, and even within the Taliban, the strict Islamic government that controls much of the country, there are differences in the way men cover their heads. This Taliban member, for example, is wearing a very long turban — perhaps two twined together — with one end hanging loose over his shoulder. The Taliban ambassador to Afghanistan, on the other hand, favors a solid black turban tied above his forehead. And some men in Afghanistan do not wear turbans at all, but rather a distinctive Afghan hat.

Iranian leaders wear black or white turbans wrapped in the flat, circular style shown in this image of Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The word turban is thought to have originated among Persians living in the area now known as Iran, who called the headgear a dulband.

Indian men sometimes wear turbans to signify their class, caste, profession or religious affiliation — and, as this man shows, turbans in India can be very elaborate. However, turbans made out of fancy woven cloths and festooned with jewels are not unique to India. As far away as Turkey, men have used the headgear to demonstrate their wealth and power.

The kaffiyeh is not technically a turban. It is really a rectangular piece of cloth, folded diagonally and then draped over the head — not wound like a turban. Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian leader, has made the kaffiyeh famous in recent times. However, the kaffiyeh is not solely Palestinian. Men in Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the Arab Persian Gulf states wear kaffiyehs in colors and styles that are particular to their region. Jordanians, for example, wear a red and white kaffiyeh, while Palestinians wear a black and white one. And a man from Saudi Arabia would likely drape his kaffiyeh differently than a man from Jordan. The black cord that holds the kaffiyeh on one’s head is called an ekal.

Desert peoples have long used the turban to keep sand out of their faces, as this man from Africa is likely doing. Members of nomadic tribes have also used turbans to disguise themselves. And sometimes, the color of a person’s turban can be used to identify his tribal affiliation from a distance across the dunes. This man’s turban is a very light blue. In some parts of North Africa, blue is thought to be a good color to wear in the desert because of its association with cool water.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY PAUL SCHMID / THE SEATTLE TIMES

My weekend.

Taking a break from tumblr

'Kay bye

You’re doing it wro-… right. You’re doing it so right.

You’re doing it wro-… right. You’re doing it so right.

(Source: togifs)